We review in this paper recent estimates of the Arctic soil carbon pool, and experimental and modeling studies.We conclude that the part of the carbon pool that is particularly vulnerable to decomposition at short and long time scales needs better quantification.The three key underlying assumptions are 1) the rate of decay of parent into daughter has remained constant throughout the unobservable past; 2) the specimen which we are examining hasn’t been contaminated in any way (that is, no parent or daughter has been added or taken away at any point during the unobservable past), and 3) we can determine how much parent and daughter were present at the beginning of the decay process – not all of the Pb206 present today necessarily came from decaying U238; Pb206 may have been part of the original constitution of the specimen.

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Okraina girls sex free cam - Assumptions made carbon dating

Question: "How does radiometric dating fit with the view of a young earth?

" Answer: Radiometric dating does not fit with the “young earth” view.

By measuring the amount of uranium and ‘radiogenic lead’ in these crystals, one can calculate that, if the decay rate has been constant, about 1.5 billion years must have passed.

(This is consistent with the geologic ‘age’ assigned to the granites in which these zircons are found.) There is a significant amount of helium from that ‘1.5 billion years of decay’ still inside the zircons.

…Results show that because of all the helium still in the zircons, these crystals (and since this is Precambrian basement granite, by implication the whole earth) could not be older than between 4,000 and 14,000 years.

In other words, in only a few thousand years, 1.5 billion years’ worth (at today’s rates) of radioactive decay has taken place” (

Estimates of the Arctic soil carbon pool have more than doubled in size recently.

However, it remains very uncertain how much of this carbon will enter the atmosphere as a result of future global warming.

Finally, we examine the potential impact of carbon product labeling, discussing methodological and trade challenges and proposing a framework for choosing products best suited for labeling.► Economic theory provides rationale for product information on carbon footprint.